Victim of cyber dating crime Hadan cam


05-May-2020 02:23

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Using social media and dating site profiles for background information, the con artists get close to their marks online through discussing hobbies and pursuits they supposedly have in common.Special Agent Christine Beining (pictured), a veteran financial fraud investigator in the FBI’s Tampa, Fla., division, has seen a substantial increase in the number of romance scam cases.The victims reported collective losses of .4 million, which is likely only a fraction of the actual losses since many victims are too embarrassed to file a report, the FBI said.About 70% of the victims were female; more than half were women 40 years or older.In the most unromantic terms, the FBI sums up the category of cybercrime this way: “A perpetrator deceives a victim” online into believing they have “a trust relationship, whether family, friendly, or romantic.” The victim is then persuaded to send money, personal and financial information, or to launder money on behalf of the perpetrator. The scams happened 18,493 times last year, the FBI reports – an average of more than 50 times a day. Victims are predominantly older widowed or divorced women, the FBI says.

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In 2011, the FBI's Internet Crime Complaint Center received 5,600 complaints from victims of so-called "romance scammers" -- criminals who scan online dating sites, chat rooms and social networking sites for potential victims.

In July, "John" told her that he was traveling to the United Kingdom to buy antiques for his store.

Then one day he called saying he went to Nigeria to buy more, but he was stuck -- he asked her for ,000 cash to get his purchases back to the States.

In a typical con, the perpetrator will spend weeks or even months building up a romantic relationship with a victim through e-mails, texts or phone calls, before eventually asking for money.

And many of the scammers aren't even in the United States.

At first, Best -- who juggles two part-time jobs working with developmentally-disabled adults and people with mental illness -- resisted, telling John she simply didn't have the money. "He was trying to get me to use my credit cards, borrow from my friends and family," said Best, who earlier told her saga to The Huffington Post.